Wellspring - Ending relationship and sexual abuse in Saratoga County


What is Teen Dating Violence?

Dating violence is a type of intimate partner violence.  The nature of dating violence can be physical, emotional or sexual.  It can take place in person or electronically–such as repeated texting or posting sexual pictures of a partner online other tactics include emotional abuse, insults, isolation from friends and family, name-calling and controlling what someone wears or with whom they socialize. It can happen to anyone, at any age, no matter what their race, religion, sexual orientation, level of education or economic background.  Consider these statistics:

• Nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year.*

• One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a statistic that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence.*

• One in 10 high school students has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend.*

At Wellspring, we believe in the magic of prevention–that by increasing awareness, we can end relationship and sexual abuse.  This is why we invest in prevention education programs about topics such as consent and healthy relationships for local teens and young adults.
 For example, our programs include:

  • A Jury’s Dilemma, a film that uses a mock trial to explore the issues of consent and teenage sexual assault.
  • Coaching Boys to Men, a program that provides high school athletic coaches with the resources they need to promote respectful behavior among their players.
  •  And ‘In Their Shoes,’ a role play based on the experiences of real teens and their experiences with issues including sexting, pregnancy, homophobia and stalking.
  • New media to help  reach youth in ways  they consume information.  Such as our video about consent, which deals  with the issues of alcohol, sex, and consent.
 
The video is part of the Prevention Council’s ‘Parent University,’ which offers free programming for parents dealing with a range of issues.

To learn more about how to talk about consent with a loved one, visit our Consent Page.

For more information about our other prevention programming, visit our Prevention Webpage.

Have questions or concerns, Wellspring staff are available 24-hours a day to talk to both victims of relationship abuse or friends and family concerned about a possible victim.  Call our hotline at 518-584-8188.

If at any time you feel that you or your teen are in immediate danger, call 911.

Other resources for parents:
Futures Without Violence‘ has a number of resources about talking with teens about teen dating violence.

‘Love is Respect‘ an organization that works to engage, educate and empower young people to prevent and end abusive relationships.

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