Wellspring - Ending relationship and sexual abuse in Saratoga County


News & Events

Their Purses Are Because They See The Need

Many of the elected officials I speak with tell me they ran for office because they had a deep commitment to their community and a few issues they felt a need to champion. So often they remark that once elected, they learned so much more about  every issue affecting the environment, economy, infrastructure and the people they serve. I'm always awestruck as they describe the breadth of knowledge they absorb in those first years of public service.

Domestic violence is often one of those issues they had never considered... but as they learn about the issues affecting public safety, are surprised to learn it's a fundamental concern. As Supervisor Peter Martin says, "Domestic violence is one of the most prominent crimes", and the services Wellspring provides are, "a vital part of our social safety net." Click here for more from Peter.


 
The United Way of the Greater Capital Region has a vision that all members of a community are connected , "These are our friends, neighbors and coworkers. As members of a community, we are all connected. One person's suffering is our suffering too. And when one person succeeds, we all win." They support programs that address four primary building blocks of wellness and self-sufficiency. 

To really understand community need, they regularly analyze strengths, challenges, obstacles and innovative best practices and share them se so programs can be most effective n the work they do with clients.  Click here to hear from Brian Hassett on why they've "always supported domestic safety organizations  and why Wellspring's services are so important."
 
Wellspring's crisis services are well known: a 24-hour hotline that responds to about 1,700 calls/year, Saratoga County's  only domestic violence shelter, and 24/7 accompaniment to the hospital or police for victims of domestic violence or sexual assault. Even non-crisis support services like counseling, and legal advocacy are well known. But many people are surprised by the multitude of services we offer to support basic needs and economic self-sufficiency. From essential needs like our food pantry, clothing assistance, and our rent subsidized housing program that last year alone provided 17,000 bed nights of safe slumber in violence-free apartments for 75 adults and children,  to holiday assistance for 200 people/year, assistance with summer camps so the parent can remain working, and backpacks and school supplies for more than 130 children this year, we regularly support families in getting back on their feet, feeling stable and becoming self- sufficient. Addressing those four basic building blocks can provide a sound foundation for a safe and healthy future.


Their Purses Are Because They See The Need

Many of the elected officials I speak with tell me they ran for office because they had a deep commitment to their community and a few issues they felt a need to champion. So often they remark that once elected, they learned so much more about  every issue affecting the environment, economy, infrastructure and the people they serve. I'm always awestruck as they describe the breadth of knowledge they absorb in those first years of public service.

Domestic violence is often one of those issues they had never considered... but as they learn about the issues affecting public safety, are surprised to learn it's a fundamental concern. As Supervisor Peter Martin says, "Domestic violence is one of the most prominent crimes", and the services Wellspring provides are, "a vital part of our social safety net." Click here for more from Peter.


 
The United Way of the Greater Capital Region has a vision that all members of a community are connected , "These are our friends, neighbors and coworkers. As members of a community, we are all connected. One person's suffering is our suffering too. And when one person succeeds, we all win." They support programs that address four primary building blocks of wellness and self-sufficiency. 

To really understand community need, they regularly analyze strengths, challenges, obstacles and innovative best practices and share them se so programs can be most effective n the work they do with clients.  Click here to hear from Brian Hassett on why they've "always supported domestic safety organizations  and why Wellspring's services are so important."
 
Wellspring's crisis services are well known: a 24-hour hotline that responds to about 1,700 calls/year, Saratoga County's  only domestic violence shelter, and 24/7 accompaniment to the hospital or police for victims of domestic violence or sexual assault. Even non-crisis support services like counseling, and legal advocacy are well known. But many people are surprised by the multitude of services we offer to support basic needs and economic self-sufficiency. From essential needs like our food pantry, clothing assistance, and our rent subsidized housing program that last year alone provided 17,000 bed nights of safe slumber in violence-free apartments for 75 adults and children,  to holiday assistance for 200 people/year, assistance with summer camps so the parent can remain working, and backpacks and school supplies for more than 130 children this year, we regularly support families in getting back on their feet, feeling stable and becoming self- sufficient. Addressing those four basic building blocks can provide a sound foundation for a safe and healthy future.


Carrying a Purse for 1 in 4 Women

Jen Perry was a dedicated board member at Wellspring for 6 years, She was motivated because she relates to the many people we assist.  She sums it up well, "Domestic violence affects people like my friends and family; it can happen to anyone at any time."  Click here for more of Jen's insights.


While relationship abuse can happen to anyone, most people aren't aware of the prevalence. Jessica Petraccione notes that, "most people don't hear about domestic violence on a regular basis." She's right (click here for more from Jessica). Even when there's a tragedy, the news often gives the details of the incident, but fails to use the words domestic violence. At Wellspring we have many clients who call our hotline or talk to our advocates who say, "This has been going on for years, but I've never told anyone until today... not even my sister." There's a saying that 'Silence Hides Violence'; it's true. Most abuse happens behind closed doors so when we don't hear about the  issue, we forget about it.


Sheena Shaw speaks with courage about domestic violence and also about why, "It's important for our youth to know where to get help."  

Did you know, Wellspring has advocates on campus at Shenendehowa and Saratoga Springs High Schools and also at Skidmore College? We know that by providing access to an advocate, students can get help with concerns about relationships, dating violence.... or find out how to help a friend who is in an abusive relationship. We provide all these services to individuals and to the schools at no charge, because early intervention is key to preventing abuse from escalating.

Carrying a Purse for 1 in 4 Women

Jen Perry was a dedicated board member at Wellspring for 6 years, She was motivated because she relates to the many people we assist.  She sums it up well, "Domestic violence affects people like my friends and family; it can happen to anyone at any time."  Click here for more of Jen's insights.


While relationship abuse can happen to anyone, most people aren't aware of the prevalence. Jessica Petraccione notes that, "most people don't hear about domestic violence on a regular basis." She's right (click here for more from Jessica). Even when there's a tragedy, the news often gives the details of the incident, but fails to use the words domestic violence. At Wellspring we have many clients who call our hotline or talk to our advocates who say, "This has been going on for years, but I've never told anyone until today... not even my sister." There's a saying that 'Silence Hides Violence'; it's true. Most abuse happens behind closed doors so when we don't hear about the  issue, we forget about it.


Sheena Shaw speaks with courage about domestic violence and also about why, "It's important for our youth to know where to get help."  

Did you know, Wellspring has advocates on campus at Shenendehowa and Saratoga Springs High Schools and also at Skidmore College? We know that by providing access to an advocate, students can get help with concerns about relationships, dating violence.... or find out how to help a friend who is in an abusive relationship. We provide all these services to individuals and to the schools at no charge, because early intervention is key to preventing abuse from escalating.

Rocking a Purse Because He Knows Prevention Works

So I took a  couple of days off from blogging to celebrate Labor Day with my family. But I'm back and thought I'd keep with the Labor Day theme by considering how lessons learned in the workplace can relate to Wellspring's vision of ending relationship and sexual abuse.
 
And that purse looks great with Dave's outfit and complexion!
Today I was talking to Dave Collins. He's seen vast changes in the construction industry because of a proactive approach to workplace safety. Listen here for  Dave's insights on how what we've learned about safety on a building worksite relates to prevention of relationship abuse. Training and education save lives in the workplace... and they can prevent abuse and save lives at home too.
 
 
Our goal at Wellspring is not just to react to incidents of domestic violence or sexual assault and help the victim, but also to raise awareness to prevent these incidents from happening in the first place. To that end we provide prevention education programs to more than 6,000 youth and community members each year.Two of these interactive programs are “A Jury’s Dilemma” and “In Her Shoes”.  “A Jury’s Dilemma” is a mock trial exploring a case of teenage sexual assault.  The program participants are the jurors in the trial. During the course of the trial, the participants hear from the defendant, the complainant, their attorneys and other witnesses. They then have guided discussion to talk about the case and their opinions, learning about the realities of a sexual assault trial in the process.  During “In Her Shoes”  participants take on the roles of clients working with Wellspring, navigating the legal system, social welfare and finding out how difficult leaving a domestic violence relationship can be,  If you are interested in having any of these programs  at your school, church our community group, contact prevention@wellspringcares.org
 

Rocking a Purse Because He Knows Prevention Works

So I took a  couple of days off from blogging to celebrate Labor Day with my family. But I'm back and thought I'd keep with the Labor Day theme by considering how lessons learned in the workplace can relate to Wellspring's vision of ending relationship and sexual abuse.
 
And that purse looks great with Dave's outfit and complexion!
Today I was talking to Dave Collins. He's seen vast changes in the construction industry because of a proactive approach to workplace safety. Listen here for  Dave's insights on how what we've learned about safety on a building worksite relates to prevention of relationship abuse. Training and education save lives in the workplace... and they can prevent abuse and save lives at home too.
 
 
Our goal at Wellspring is not just to react to incidents of domestic violence or sexual assault and help the victim, but also to raise awareness to prevent these incidents from happening in the first place. To that end we provide prevention education programs to more than 6,000 youth and community members each year.Two of these interactive programs are “A Jury’s Dilemma” and “In Her Shoes”.  “A Jury’s Dilemma” is a mock trial exploring a case of teenage sexual assault.  The program participants are the jurors in the trial. During the course of the trial, the participants hear from the defendant, the complainant, their attorneys and other witnesses. They then have guided discussion to talk about the case and their opinions, learning about the realities of a sexual assault trial in the process.  During “In Her Shoes”  participants take on the roles of clients working with Wellspring, navigating the legal system, social welfare and finding out how difficult leaving a domestic violence relationship can be,  If you are interested in having any of these programs  at your school, church our community group, contact prevention@wellspringcares.org
 

Still Puzzled?

Here is the answer to yesterday's puzzle!  We took the liberty of coloring it as well, but if you look you can see it is...
 
A Purple Purse!
 
I hope everyone has a fantastic labor day weekend!

Still Puzzled?

Here is the answer to yesterday's puzzle!  We took the liberty of coloring it as well, but if you look you can see it is...
 
A Purple Purse!
 
I hope everyone has a fantastic labor day weekend!

Puzzled?


While we are so excited about Purple Purse in October, even we need a break sometimes.  Our vision of ending relationship and sexual abuse in our community is a big one, but that doesn't mean we can't have a bit of fun now and again. Below is a fun little puzzle to help us relax, while still getting out an important message.

This is a type of puzzle known as a Nonogram or Picross.  You can find full instructions for this type of puzzle here http://www.nonograms.org/instructions. 
 

If you solve it, you’ll reveal a hidden picture relating to what we have going on in October!
Good luck, and we will be revealing the answer tomorrow!

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