Wellspring - Ending relationship and sexual abuse in Saratoga County


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Misleading Lolita

I'm showing my age here, but it seems that our culture is robbing our young girls of their childhood and pushing maturity on them in their early teens. And they're not winning either way.

Fashion trends like Victoria's Secret's  Bright Young Things campaign encourage teens or even tweens to wear revealing or seductive clothes.   But as we've seen recently in the Montana  rape case, when a young girl is sexually victimized her appearance can be used to excuse the actions of the adult perpetrator.

Here's an interesting article, The Six Ways We Talk About a Girl's Age, that explores our often confused and contradictory social biases about being a girl.



Related posts:
 
Montana Rape case;

It Works the Other Way Too

A new study from Columbia  University links teen drinking to viewing pics of others drinking on facebook or other social media... a new digital take on peer pressure. About 40% of kids have seen pics on their social media sites of other kids drinking...and there's a  correlation between social media and risk behaviors. Deseret news summarizes the report with these startling statistics:

 "Teens who use social media are five times more likely to use tobacco,
three times more likely to drink alcohol and twice as likely to use marijuana." 

A survey of parents showed that parents weren't attuned to these influences;
  • 87% said social networking won't influence their child's drinking
  • 89% said it won't influence drug use, and
  • only 64% of parents monitored their child's social networking

But despite its bad rap, peer pressure can also be a good thing. Most kids are making good decisions... but they often hear so much about the other decisions that they think they're tin the minority. They're wrong. Through their Strength in Numbers campaign the Shenendehowa Community Coalition is working to change that. They've polled their students and are giving them the facts in a really memorable way. Here are just a few:
  • 71% of Shen students thinking drinking regularly is uncool
  • 86% did not get in a car with a drunk driver, and
  • 96% do not drink and drive.
We know kids are influenced by what they see on social media... let's give them the real facts.

It Works the Other Way Too

A new study from Columbia  University links teen drinking to viewing pics of others drinking on facebook or other social media... a new digital take on peer pressure. About 40% of kids have seen pics on their social media sites of other kids drinking...and there's a  correlation between social media and risk behaviors. Deseret news summarizes the report with these startling statistics:

 "Teens who use social media are five times more likely to use tobacco,
three times more likely to drink alcohol and twice as likely to use marijuana." 

A survey of parents showed that parents weren't attuned to these influences;
  • 87% said social networking won't influence their child's drinking
  • 89% said it won't influence drug use, and
  • only 64% of parents monitored their child's social networking

But despite its bad rap, peer pressure can also be a good thing. Most kids are making good decisions... but they often hear so much about the other decisions that they think they're tin the minority. They're wrong. Through their Strength in Numbers campaign the Shenendehowa Community Coalition is working to change that. They've polled their students and are giving them the facts in a really memorable way. Here are just a few:
  • 71% of Shen students thinking drinking regularly is uncool
  • 86% did not get in a car with a drunk driver, and
  • 96% do not drink and drive.
We know kids are influenced by what they see on social media... let's give them the real facts.

Women Don’t Do This as Well as Men



  • Nearly 14 million women do this to excess regularly every month. And who are they? Those with incomes over $75,000, women 18-34, and high school girls.
  • Our bodies don't adapt to this as well as men's bodies, and we're more likely to have serious, even deadly, problems.
  • This activity ups our breast cancer risk, and
  • I'd add this activity is a contributing factor in the majority of sexual assaults. 

Women Don’t Do This as Well as Men



  • Nearly 14 million women do this to excess regularly every month. And who are they? Those with incomes over $75,000, women 18-34, and high school girls.
  • Our bodies don't adapt to this as well as men's bodies, and we're more likely to have serious, even deadly, problems.
  • This activity ups our breast cancer risk, and
  • I'd add this activity is a contributing factor in the majority of sexual assaults. 

Sometimes Raising Your Voice is the Right Thing to Do

Sometimes public outrage makes us take a second look at things. A few days ago I wrote about a statutory rape case in which a teacher was sentenced to a mere 30 days for having sex with a 14 year old student, who later committed suicide. The judge imposed such a minimal sentence because he opined the child was "older than her chronological years" and "was as much in control of the situation" as the teacher who raped her.

Protesters brought the issue to national attention, calling for the judge's resignation. Well, according to the Huffington Post that sentence is being appealed as it does not meet the state's minimum mandatory sentencing for this crime.

This is not the first time that protesters have challenged  a judge's sentence that minimized the actions of a rapist by blaming the victim. In 1997, women in the Italian Parliament rallied in outrage when a judge blamed a teenager who was raped by her driving instructor for the assault because she was wearing tight jeans. That incident launched Denim Day, an international day of recognition about sexual violence and a call to action.

Sometimes Raising Your Voice is the Right Thing to Do

Sometimes public outrage makes us take a second look at things. A few days ago I wrote about a statutory rape case in which a teacher was sentenced to a mere 30 days for having sex with a 14 year old student, who later committed suicide. The judge imposed such a minimal sentence because he opined the child was "older than her chronological years" and "was as much in control of the situation" as the teacher who raped her.

Protesters brought the issue to national attention, calling for the judge's resignation. Well, according to the Huffington Post that sentence is being appealed as it does not meet the state's minimum mandatory sentencing for this crime.

This is not the first time that protesters have challenged  a judge's sentence that minimized the actions of a rapist by blaming the victim. In 1997, women in the Italian Parliament rallied in outrage when a judge blamed a teenager who was raped by her driving instructor for the assault because she was wearing tight jeans. That incident launched Denim Day, an international day of recognition about sexual violence and a call to action.

Molly… don’t invite her to the party

New York City's mayor canceled the final day of the Electric Zoo concert as two concert goers died and four others ended up in intensive care...all due to overdoses of  MDMA, also known as, Ecstasy or Molly. This isn't a new drug; it was originally synthesized for medical purposes in the early 1900's but the 1970's drug culture launched the recreational use of MDMA  to achieve altered states of consciousness. The club scene in the 1980-90's resurrected the drug's  popularity under the name Ecstasy.   

And  where and how Molly is used  contribute to the drug's dangerousness. The signs of impending overdose include hyperthermia (excessive overheating), inability to sweat, and confusion; combined with the euphoria, loss of inhibition,  and altered state of consciousness the user loses the ability to monitor his/her level of functioning. The drug is often used in large crowded rooms such as dance clubs; these conditions exacerbate the overheating and dehydration that can lead to potentially fatal hyperthermia. Even after the drug has worn off, Molly still poses a risk. Days after using Molly, the individual may experience low moods or depression. 

With a new name, Molly use is once again rising ; popular music includes references to the drug. Throughout the decades, whenever MDMA resurfaces, there are reports of young people dying (sometimes the first and only time they've used the drug.) This is one dangerous fad... and it's risks should be taken seriously. Just ask NYC.


Molly… don’t invite her to the party

New York City's mayor canceled the final day of the Electric Zoo concert as two concert goers died and four others ended up in intensive care...all due to overdoses of  MDMA, also known as, Ecstasy or Molly. This isn't a new drug; it was originally synthesized for medical purposes in the early 1900's but the 1970's drug culture launched the recreational use of MDMA  to achieve altered states of consciousness. The club scene in the 1980-90's resurrected the drug's  popularity under the name Ecstasy.   

And  where and how Molly is used  contribute to the drug's dangerousness. The signs of impending overdose include hyperthermia (excessive overheating), inability to sweat, and confusion; combined with the euphoria, loss of inhibition,  and altered state of consciousness the user loses the ability to monitor his/her level of functioning. The drug is often used in large crowded rooms such as dance clubs; these conditions exacerbate the overheating and dehydration that can lead to potentially fatal hyperthermia. Even after the drug has worn off, Molly still poses a risk. Days after using Molly, the individual may experience low moods or depression. 

With a new name, Molly use is once again rising ; popular music includes references to the drug. Throughout the decades, whenever MDMA resurfaces, there are reports of young people dying (sometimes the first and only time they've used the drug.) This is one dangerous fad... and it's risks should be taken seriously. Just ask NYC.



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