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Making It Right

A bar in Texas was at the center of a controversy when an employee posted a sign outside making light of domestic violence. The sign read, "I like my beer like I like my beer like I like my violence... domestic." When a passerby, who happens to to volunteer at a domestic violence shelter, posted the image on facebook and Instagram, her posts garnered national attention. While I find the sign offensive and insensitive, there's a silver lining to this story. When the bar owner learned of the incident, he decided to donate $1 from the purchase of every domestic beer during October in recognition of domestic violence awareness month. He not only took a bad situation and made it right... he demonstrated integrity and leadership.

There are actually two heroes in this story: the bar owner and the woman who cared enough to speak out. Because of her courage, the people who walk past that bar every day stopped to think about the meaning of that sign instead of just passing by and ignoring it or laughing at it. Her simple action changed the social norms in her community.

So that's my tip for today. If you see something, say something. Sometimes the simplest actions are like a pebble tossed into a pond-- they create ripples that continue far beyond the initial impact. As Gandhi said, You must be the change you wish to see in the world."

Making It Right

A bar in Texas was at the center of a controversy when an employee posted a sign outside making light of domestic violence. The sign read, "I like my beer like I like my beer like I like my violence... domestic." When a passerby, who happens to to volunteer at a domestic violence shelter, posted the image on facebook and Instagram, her posts garnered national attention. While I find the sign offensive and insensitive, there's a silver lining to this story. When the bar owner learned of the incident, he decided to donate $1 from the purchase of every domestic beer during October in recognition of domestic violence awareness month. He not only took a bad situation and made it right... he demonstrated integrity and leadership.

There are actually two heroes in this story: the bar owner and the woman who cared enough to speak out. Because of her courage, the people who walk past that bar every day stopped to think about the meaning of that sign instead of just passing by and ignoring it or laughing at it. Her simple action changed the social norms in her community.

So that's my tip for today. If you see something, say something. Sometimes the simplest actions are like a pebble tossed into a pond-- they create ripples that continue far beyond the initial impact. As Gandhi said, You must be the change you wish to see in the world."

Shine a Light 2013-10-05 22:55:00

The recent  murder/suicide in Saratoga Springs is a tragic reminder that elder abuse is a serious concern. One in ten elders is abused, and 90% of abusers are family members. Elder abuse can take many forms: neglect, physical abuse, social isolation, financial exploitation, emotional or psychological abuse.

When a parent is abused by their adult child, they are often reticent to report the crime to authorities, or even to tell anyone. They may:
  •  be worried about their son or daughter
  •  want to protect him/her
  •  be dependent on the abusive family member for health care or transportation,or
  • feel guilty, "I must have done something wrong raising my child for him/her to treat me this way."  
Victims of elder abuse are our most vulnerable citizens (the median age of abused elders is 77.9 years), yet they're often not able to advocate for themselves. That's why it's important that we all know the signs of elder abuse and take action if we're concerned. Don't know what to look for? Click on this post to view an excellent video, so you can recognize the signs of elder abuse.

Shine a Light 2013-10-05 21:55:00

The recent  murder/suicide in Saratoga Springs is a tragic reminder that elder abuse is a serious concern. One in ten elders is abused, and 90% of abusers are family members. Elder abuse can take many forms: neglect, physical abuse, social isolation, financial exploitation, emotional or psychological abuse.

When a parent is abused by their adult child, they are often reticent to report the crime to authorities, or even to tell anyone. They may:
  •  be worried about their son or daughter
  •  want to protect him/her
  •  be dependent on the abusive family member for health care or transportation,or
  • feel guilty, "I must have done something wrong raising my child for him/her to treat me this way."  
Victims of elder abuse are our most vulnerable citizens (the median age of abused elders is 77.9 years), yet they're often not able to advocate for themselves. That's why it's important that we all know the signs of elder abuse and take action if we're concerned. Don't know what to look for? Click on this post to view an excellent video, so you can recognize the signs of elder abuse.

Not always domestic, not always violent

The term domestic violence can sometimes be misleading:
  • Violence conjures up images of a black eye or other physical abuse. Domestic violence covers a range of abusive behaviors, many which do not include physical violence: emotional, psychological abuse, financial control, social isolation to name a few. 

  • For me, just the word 'domestic' conjures up images  of home and family, married relationship. Domestic violence occurs in dating and unmarried couples, same sex couples, and adolescent and elder relationships. It can happen in the home, at school or work, or even via electronic media.
So 1 in four teens reports having experienced abusive behaviors in a dating relationship, but they're probably not thinking of this as domestic violence... and that means they're probably not getting the help they need to be safe. So here's 2 videos created for DVRC by Skidmore students that show what relationship abuse looks like in a dating relationship.
 

 
 


Related posts:
Red Flags of Dating Violence

Not always domestic, not always violent

The term domestic violence can sometimes be misleading:
  • Violence conjures up images of a black eye or other physical abuse. Domestic violence covers a range of abusive behaviors, many which do not include physical violence: emotional, psychological abuse, financial control, social isolation to name a few. 

  • For me, just the word 'domestic' conjures up images  of home and family, married relationship. Domestic violence occurs in dating and unmarried couples, same sex couples, and adolescent and elder relationships. It can happen in the home, at school or work, or even via electronic media.
So 1 in four teens reports having experienced abusive behaviors in a dating relationship, but they're probably not thinking of this as domestic violence... and that means they're probably not getting the help they need to be safe. So here's 2 videos created for DVRC by Skidmore students that show what relationship abuse looks like in a dating relationship.
 

 
 


Related posts:
Red Flags of Dating Violence

You’re a Friend… Be Prepared

For Domestic Violence Awareness Month, I've offered a challenge. Do something, large or small, to raise awareness or help someone affected by relationship abuse.. and I'm offering ideas on what you can do. Today's suggestions revolve around preparing yourself so you know what to do if someone you care about is in need.

I'm often asked why women or men stay in abusive relationships. There are as many answers for that as there are relationships: fear, hoping that something will happen that just makes the abuse end,  concern for breaking a family apart, worry about what will happen to the kids, economics, and love (yes quite simply they love their partner and don't want the relationship to end... just the abuse.)

It's hard (frustrating, and sometimes terrifying) to know that someone you know is in an abusive relationship, but not be able to do anything about it. So what can you do when someone you know is in an abusive relationship?


You’re a Friend… Be Prepared

For Domestic Violence Awareness Month, I've offered a challenge. Do something, large or small, to raise awareness or help someone affected by relationship abuse.. and I'm offering ideas on what you can do. Today's suggestions revolve around preparing yourself so you know what to do if someone you care about is in need.

I'm often asked why women or men stay in abusive relationships. There are as many answers for that as there are relationships: fear, hoping that something will happen that just makes the abuse end,  concern for breaking a family apart, worry about what will happen to the kids, economics, and love (yes quite simply they love their partner and don't want the relationship to end... just the abuse.)

It's hard (frustrating, and sometimes terrifying) to know that someone you know is in an abusive relationship, but not be able to do anything about it. So what can you do when someone you know is in an abusive relationship?



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